Negative Space

8678947_origCreating games is an art. It is no wonder that the same concepts appear here. One of them is Negative Space. This is easiest to describe as what is not, something that stays aloof or is filled with space.

In games, this term is used in many places, because games consist of multiple elements. Image, history, sound, world, gameplay.

Let's start with the fact that negative Space doesn't have to be that negative (it was my first thought when zapoznawałem with this topic).

To begin, think about the image. Negative space can help the player to focus on what should be important to him right now. Perhaps a classic example (though usually weak from a design point of view) will be blurring the game screen in tutorials, and leaving only the element that is to be clicked by the player. In obvious way, the background turns into nothing insignificant mush, which has catch eyes to the only clear object.

This whole concept is of great importance when it comes to constructing levels. Probably to perfection of this art mastered the companies creating great titles FPS, in which skillful directing the player's sight on the elements of the Board is of particular importance. These all 'nic not meaningful ' lines, arrows, setting objects often have no bagatelne meaning for overall game pickup. However, there is another page of negative gaming space. It is about adequate filling of places. It will be easy for me to describe this in The Witcher example, in which the quests lead us through the world in such a way that somewhere farther there are elements that 650i our attention, such as the ruined building. Players instinctively want to explore such places. The Witcher rewards us for this curiosity and the desire to explore, leaving some prizes in these places.

When referring to sounds, negative space can also be applied. Turning off music can help build up the tension, and for example, replacing all the sounds with a static noise or squeak can make up a screen flash that is accompanied by a grenade stun effect.

The story we are telling you in the game, too, needs a little of this negative space so that you can cool or think about what we just saw. If we were still accused of important and dynamic moments, they lost their weight and changed into an incomprehensible mush. He reminded me of Rambo, in this film, in which he fought with the sheriff. They are interspersed with moments of tranquility. Shooting, rockets, and then a slower action in the mine. Audition, then escape from custody. Despite the fact that there is still something going on, you can feel some moments to soothe us.

It's time to determine the importance of negative space in the gameplay itself. As in Rambo the idea is to give the player from time to time to mute. Even the last DOOM, which is a damn dynamic shooter uses negative space. Moments swift action, which is here a positive space interspersed with moments of exploration (negative space, no action Swift). However, to be able to use such a trick, you need to know what your game is, what is a positive space… What does not have to be so obvious, because the game can be received differently by different people. Negative space can help the player properly dose the impressions, prevent excess emotions that can make zobojętnieje and burn out. Much depends on the game itself…

An interesting example of the negative space that I want to have the worlds of MMORPG games. Again I will pastwił over the WoWem:) Take a look at how sites where you have a great you change slowly in negative space along with how your level rises. When you are already much stronger than mobs in a particular region, it becomes practically a background or the rest of the world. It's fun to advised with it in GW2, where our character level is scaled down to match the level of challenges posed by the game in a given place. Importantly, the player can still feel a bit stronger than other characters in the area, with the fact that he has a larger skill resource that is not received from him when he enters the Niskopoziomowej site.

Of course, not every game requires that you press "nothing" somewhere. Some games are normally based on a continuous thing. For this reason, game design so much interesting to me, because each case is different and everywhere appears "it depends"

Worth a peek:
Gamasutra
Extra Credits